ASUR Presents Upcoming August Workshops on Writing + Resistance

Please spread the word and consider attending these upcoming workshops on creativity + resistance.  Please note : must preorder $5-20 tix to attend

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/witness-and-resistance-in-the-mind-and-on-the-page-tickets-36624691438

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/witness-and-resistance-in-body-and-story-tickets-36625572072

Witness and Resistance in Body and Story

 

Alley Cat Bookstore and Gallery

3036 24th Street

San Francisco, CA 94110

Lifting Scars with Sharon Coleman
A somatic writing and movement workshop by Sharon Coleman. 2-3pm
Resilience depends on the quick scarring over of wounds, both psychic and physical. And they remain with us usually forever. They are emblems of what has touched us. They mend muscle and thought but leave tissue that interferes with movement and neuro-plasticity. In this workshop, we’ll use movement and writing to explore the shapes left by scars and to find movement, resilience, and determination from what has marked us. Wear comfortable clothes and bring a notebook and pen.
BIO: Sharon Coleman’s a fifth-generation Northern Californian with a penchant for languages and their entangled word roots. She has taught poetry, creative writing and composition for fifteen years at Berkeley City College. She writes for Poetry Flash, co-curates the reading series Lyrics & Dirges and co-directs the Berkeley Poetry Festival. She’s the author of a chapbook of poetry, Half Circle, and a book of micro-fiction, Paris Blinks (Paper Press 2016.)

The Composer’s Notebook with Tongo Eisen-Martin
In this workshop from 3-4pm, community worker and poet, Tongo Eisen-Martin explores how engagement in community can be channeled into music, innovation, and poetry.

BIO: Born in San Francisco, Tongo Eisen-Martin is a movement worker, educator, and poet who has organized against mass incarceration and extra-judicial killing of Black people throughout the United States. He is the author of someone’s dead already (Bootstrap Press, 2015), which was nominated for a California Book Award. He has educated in detention centers from New York’s Rikers Island to California’s San Quentin State Prison. His work in Rikers Island was featured in the New York Times. He was also adjunct faculty at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University in New York. Subscribing to the Freirian model of education, he designed curricula for oppressed people’s education projects from San Francisco to South Africa. His latest curriculum on extrajudicial killing of Black people, We Charge Genocide Again, has been used as an educational and organizing tool throughout the country. He uses his craft to create liberated territory wherever he performs and teaches. He recently lived and organized around issues of human rights and self-determination in Jackson, MS.

TWO MORE WRITING + ACTIVISM WORKSHOPS

From writing prompt to action with Maya Chinchilla

How do you cultivate a reflective stance in your writing and prompts to invigorate your writing and activism? This will be addressed in Maya Chapina’s workshop at 2pm.

BIO: Maya Chinchilla is a Guatemalan, Bay Area-based writer, video artist, educator and author of “The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poética.” Maya received her MFA in English and Creative Writing from Mills College and her undergraduate degree from University of California, Santa Cruz, where she also founded and co-edited the annual publication, La Revista. Maya writes and performs poetry that explores themes of historical memory, heartbreak, tenderness, sexuality, and alternative futures. Her work —sassy, witty, performative, and self-aware— draws on a tradition of truth-telling and poking fun at the wounds we carry.

Her work has been published in anthologies and journals including: Mujeres de Maíz, Sinister Wisdom, Americas y Latinas: A Stanford Journal of Latin American Studies, Cipactli Journal, and The Lunada Literary Anthology. Maya is a founding member of the performance group Las Manas, a former artist-in-residence at Galería de La Raza in San Francisco, CA, and La Peña Cultural Center in Berkeley, CA, and is a VONA Voices, Dos Brujas and Letras Latinas workshop alum. She is the co-editor of “Desde El Epicentro: An anthology of Central American Poetry and Art” and is a lecturer at San Francisco State University, UC Davis and other Bay Area universities.

ResistBot Poems with Raina J. León

In this workshop at 3pm, we will write poetry and prose of resistance and use the tool, ResistBot, to send these pieces to our representatives and senators. Bring your notebooks, pens, and phones (if you have them) to text through ResistBot.

BIO:

Raina J. León, PhD, CantoMundo fellow, Cave Canem graduate fellow (2006) and member of the Carolina African American Writers Collective, has been published in numerous journals as a writer of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. She is the author of three collections of poetry, Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn,sombra: (dis)locate (2016) and the chapbook, profeta without refuge (2016)She has received fellowships and residencies with Macondo, Cave Canem, CantoMundo, Montana Artists Refuge, the Macdowell Colony, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, among others. She is a founding editor of The Acentos Review, an online quarterly, international journal devoted to the promotion and publication of Latinx arts. She is an associate professor of education at Saint Mary’s College of California.

 

For more info click on these links:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/witness-and-resistance-in-the-mind-and-on-the-page-tickets-36624691438

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/witness-and-resistance-in-body-and-story-tickets-36625572072

Advertisements

Early Bird Registration for Hedgebrook Bridging One Day Retreat ends Friday, May 19

Bridging: A One-Day Hedgebrook Writing Retreat
With Keynote Speaker Karen Joy Fowler
At Saint Mary’s College of California
Hedgebrook and SMC MFA in Creative Writing are collaborating to present a one-day writing retreat for women and female-identified writers.

Date: Saturday, June 10, 2017

Time: 8:00 am – 9:00 pm

Register Here

Location:
Saint Mary’s College of California
1928 Saint Mary’s Road
Moraga, CA 94575

Keynote Speaker
Karen

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of seven novels and three short story collections. Her most recent novel We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves was short listed for the Man Booker Prize, winner of the 2014 PEN/Faulkner Award and The California Book Award for Fiction. The Jane Austen Book Club spent thirteen weeks on the New York Times bestsellers list and was a New York Times Notable Book. Fowler’s previous novel, Sister Noon, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction. Her debut novel, Sarah Canary, was a New York Times Notable Book, as was her second novel, The Sweetheart Season. In addition, Sarah Canary won the Commonwealth medal for best first novel by a Californian, and was listed for the Irish Times International Fiction Prize as well as the Bay Area Book Reviewers Prize. Fowler’s short story collection Black Glass won the World Fantasy Award in 1999, and her collection What I Didn’t See won the World Fantasy Award in 2011. Fowler and her husband, who have two grown children and seven grandchildren, live in Santa Cruz, California. She is the co-founder of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award and has served as president of the Clarion Foundation (also known as Clarion San Diego). karenjoyfowler.com

Workshops

From Artist Statement to Press Kit: A Po-Biz* Workshop

Raina

Raina J. León has been published in numerous journals as a writer of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. She is a Cave Canem graduate fellow (2006), CantoMundo fellow, Macondo fellow, and member of the Carolina African American Writers Collective, She is the author of three collections of poetry, Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn, and sombra: (dis)locate (2016) and the chapbook, profeta without refuge (2016). She has received fellowships and residencies with the Montana Artists Refuge, the Macdowell Colony, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, the Tyrone Guthrie Center in Annamaghkerrig, Ireland and Ragdale. She also is a founding editor of The Acentos Review, an online quarterly, international journal devoted to the promotion and publication of Latinx arts. She is an associate professor of education at Saint Mary’s College of California. http://www.rainaleon.com

*Poetry Business

Story Development: Plot, Character and 7 Steps to Authentic Storytelling

image 1Angie Powers has an M.F.A. in English and Creative Writing from Mills College, where she won the Amanda Davis Thesis Award for her novel, The Blessed. She also has a Certificate in Screenwriting from the Professional Programs at UCLA. She is the co-director and co-writer of the short Little Mutinies (distributed by Frameline and an official selection of the Palm Springs International Short Fest) andwas a quarter-finalist for the Nicholl Fellowship and at Blue Cat Screenplay Competition for the full-length screenplay of Little Mutinies. She is currently in development on a feature-length comedy Lost in the Middle. She is a teacher and cofounder at bookwritingworld.com. Angiepowers.com

Flash Nonfiction: Sharpening Your Story for the Short and Long Haul

image 3 Jill Kolongowski is the author of Life Lessons Harry Potter Taught Me, forthcoming from Ulysses Press. She is also the managing editor at YesYes Books. Her essays have won Sundog Lit’s First Annual Contest series and the Diana Woods Memorial Prize in Creative Nonfiction at Lunch Ticket magazine. Other essays are published in Profane, Sweet: A Literary Confection, Forklift, Ohio, Southern Indiana Review, Fugue, and elsewhere. Jill was born in Michigan, but now lives near San Francisco, where she teaches writing, hikes, and watches Chopped marathons.

Applying for Fellowships and Residencies: Writing Personal Statements and Project Proposals

image 4 Rashaan Alexis Meneses has received fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, The International Retreat for Writers at Hawthornden Castle, UK, and the Jacob K. Javits Program. Her fiction and non-fiction is published in various journals and anthologies, including Kartika Review, Puerto Del Sol, New Letters, BorderSenses, Kurungabaa, The Coachella Review, Pembroke Magazine, Doveglion Press, and the anthology Growing Up Filipino II: More Stories for Young Adults. You can find her at rashaanalexismeneses.com

Cost
$115 until May 6
$130 after May 6
Limited partial scholarships available. EmailJoanne Furio for an application.
Special accommodations available. Email Joanne Furio.

Cost includes:

Food (three meals, happy hour, and evening cake and coffee)
Vegan and gluten-free options available
Networking opportunities with Bay Area women writers’ groups
An evening keynote by Karen Joy Fowler, author of We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Sister Noon and Black Glass and Hedgebrook alumna
Your choice of one of four afternoon workshops
Funds raised from the retreat benefit both programs and the newly established Hedgebrook scholarship for a St. Mary’s MFA student.

 

More info here.

Presenting at Hedgebrook Bridging One Day Retreat for Women Writers

Bridging: A One-Day Writing Retreat

With Keynote Speaker Karen Joy Fowler
At Saint Mary’s College of California

 

Logo: In Collaboration with Hedgebrook

Hedgebrook and SMC MFA in Creative Writing are collaborating to present a one-day writing retreat for women.

Date: Saturday, June 10, 2017

Time: 8:00 am – 9:00 pm
Retreat Schedule

Location:
Saint Mary’s College of California
1928 Saint Mary’s Road
Moraga, CA 94575

I’m honored to be facilitating a writing workshop on applying for residencies and fellowships at this year’s Hedgebrook Bridging One Day Retreat for women, taking place Saturday, June 10, 8am-9pm, in collaboration and hosted at Saint Mary’s College of California, MFA Creative Writing Program, with Karen Joy Fowler as keynote speaker. I’ll be presenting alongside literary luminaries: Raina León (poetry), Angie Powers (fiction), and Jill Kolongowski (non-fiction)
Partial scholarships are available, and the fee is reasonably priced ($130), including three meals and happy hour. Please consider saving the date and spreading the word to fellow women writers. You can find more details here.
Also, if you haven’t had a chance, please peep out my latest story, “The Expectant” included in Kartika Review, Issue #17 alongside an interview with Vanessa Hua.

Finally feeling writerly again with a new story included in Kartika Review, Issue #17

2017 has been difficult so far, along with the daily grind of prepping for three classes, grading endless waves of paper and the added dimension of changing diapers, reading Amelia Bedelia for the fifth or sixth time before bed, and waking to croup at three in the morning, our family has also faced the loss of dear family and friends, who departed this world earlier in the year. Its hard to feel writerly with so much going on, and I wasn’t sure I would ever see my name in print anytime soon, but some how a story I worked on lifetimes ago finally gets to see the light of day.

Years in the making–long before I ever thought I could ever be expecting myself–I came across a news story about police cracking down on a birth center east of Los Angeles. I remember telling dear friend and writer Wesley Gibson how I was interested in writing a short story about this birth center, and I remember how he encouraged me to pursue the story. Wesley could always make me laugh. He was a walking, talking martini, and I will miss him for all my days. Thanks to Wesley, I was able to jump down the rabbit hole that is “The Expectant” and so I’ve dedicated the story to him, which is now featured in Kartika Review, Issue #17.

I don’t think I could have found a better home for this piece, and I am so honored to have my work included in this issue, which also features an interview with the great Vanessa Hua, commentary on APIA Writing by Barbara Jane Reyes and Craig Santos Perez along with work from other literary talents. See more info below.

Please check out the newly launched Kartika Review, Issue #17 and consider passing along this good read to friends, family, students, and other literary lovers. And, thanks always for the support!

To read “The Expectant” click here.

 

Issue Release Announcement

Kartika Review, Issue 17, Spring 2017

http://www.kartikareview.com/17

We’re happy to announce the publication of Kartika Review’s Issue 17, featuring poetry by Yuan Changming, Anthony Tao, Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan, and Seo-Young Chu; fiction by Kimarlee Nguyen, Anna Dong, and Rashaan Alexis Meneses; creative nonfiction by Victoria Wong, Sandra Mizumoto Posey, Hana Chittenden Maruyama, and Kristiana Kahakauwila; APIA Writingscape commentary by Craig Santos Perez, Barbara Jane Reyes, Kao Kalia Yang, Rajiv Mohabir, and Lehua M. Taitano; and an author interview with Vanessa Hua.

Table of Contents

Editorial

Poetry

·      “Anagrammed Variations of the American Dream,” Yuan Changming

·      “Things That Taste Like Purple,” Anthony Tao

·      “God on Display,” Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan

·      “Man on Display,” Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan

·      “M’어머니,” Seo-Young Chu

Fiction

·      “This Is a Story We All Know,” Kimarlee Nguyen

·      “Little Sister Lin,” Anna Dong

·      “The Expectant,” Rashaan Alexis Meneses

Creative Nonfiction

·      “Burnt,” Victoria Wong

·      “Why Japanese Persimmons Are Hard,” Sandra Mizumoto Posey

·      “Fear Itself,” Hana Chittenden Maruyama

·      “Let Us Be Antibodies,” Kristiana Kahakauwila

APIA Writingscape

·      APIA Writers on Today’s Political Climate (Featuring the voices of Craig Santos Perez, Barbara Jane Reyes, Kao Kalia Yang, Rajiv Mohabir, and Lehua M. Taitano)

·      Author Interview With Vanessa Hua

Back Matter

·      Contributor Bios

·      Submission Guidelines

·      About Kartika Review

 

 

Honored to be selected as Visiting Arts Faculty 2017-2018

I confess I have a debilitating case of imposter syndrome, so every bit of success comes with a dark lining of doubt,  but dear friend and writer Katherine Field, has urged me to celebrate this one, so this is me celebrating. I’m honored and excited to serve Saint Mary’s College of California’s Collegiate Seminar Program and January Term program in a new role as Visiting Arts Faculty for 2017-2018. More on this soon…

Interview with Jee Yoon Lee’s “Writing Like an Asian”

screen-shot-2016-09-10-at-1-40-25-pm

Most days I feel like a mess, other days I know I’m an educator, a wife, a mom, a hiker, a home cook and gardener, but I love the days when I can call myself a “Writer” and thanks to Melissa Sipin, I got a chance to escape the imposter syndrome and discuss some of my greatest loves and life’s passions. Professor Jee Yoon Lee, who teaches at the Georgetown University Writing Program, has created an incredibly comprehensive website featuring Asian/American writers and artists with “Writing Like An Asian.” The scope is astonishingly wide and the interviews are deep, such as Q&A’s with Sipin, Barbara Jane Reyes, Marianne Villaneuva, David Mura, and the list goes on and on.

Here’s a taste:

Every word I write is summoned by my mixed race heritage, and the hundreds if not thousands of miles my grandparents traveled from the Philippines and from Mexico to make a life for them selves and for our family here in the States. I feel in some sense I am re-telling the same story, the origin of our mixed ancestry. How opposing forces from different parts of the world came together to make new.

Read the entire interview here.

Peep out my interview and please share with lovers of lit to spread the word on “Writing Like An Asian.”

 

Recap on Great Writing 2016: The International Creative Writing Conference, UK, Part I

image

On the outskirts of Imperial College, London and just a block away from Hyde Park and the Royal Albert Hall, in the Huxley Building set on Queens Gate road, Great Writing 2016: The International Creative Writing Conference took place Saturday 18 June through Sunday 19 June.
image

On my way to the conference, a fifteen minute walk from our Kensington Flat where three generations of my family were blessed enough to call our home away from home in London, I got to see a quieter side of the great cosmopolitan city. Streets were virtually empty, and I spied one of the iconic historic blue plaques, alerting me to a former residence of none other than Benny Hill.
image

The conference was all about process, valuing process more than the product of writing, which was really a pleasant surprise. Below are some tidbits from the panelists, whose ideas I will definitely be thieving for writing courses and for crafting my creative writing.

Rachel Robertson of Curtin University spoke on “A Mosaic Patterning: Space, time, and the lyric essay” where she illuminates on Bakhtin’s “chronotope,” how time and space are fused and unraveled, in which time knots and unknots itself, and narrative is suspended. Robertson cited the Zen phrase “emptiness is form and form is emptiness.” Form was a continual theme that arose throughout the conference, particularly the shaping of form through the crafting or process of art-making. Robertson compared how music and dance are the only art forms that truly free us from the historical space, embodying the “presentic” space, where time fails to be to be anchored or concretized. She also spoke of the bricolage, which was first introduced to yours truly at Miguel Syjuco’s reading of Ilustrado, when I asked him how he researched for his novel, he said he used a bricolage. Robertson spoke of bricolage as a repetition of imagery, a mosaic.

The second presentation of the panel was one of the most enlightening talks from Karma Waltononen from UC Davis. Her presentation covered “Writing Outside the Lines: From ‘Essay’ to Creative Non-fiction” where she talked about teaching the creative non-fiction essay as breaking away from the required rhetoric and composition. Many students tend to believe an essay means one thing only: a three point thesis with five point paragraphs and no real development for each paragraph.
Waltonen discussed how when she introduces an essay students feel like they’re having the rug pulled out from under them. She takes them back to the root of the word’s origin. ‘Essay’ is simply: to try.
She lets students know that they need to just take a chance and be rewarded for taking a chance.

Waltonen immerses them in the 4th genre and has her students think about the choices they make. She emphasizes that a good essay demonstrates a voice. At the end of the semester, students try to determine different writers’ style by having them guess whose voice is is whose. Another assignment is to have students record a conversation in the cafeteria, so they get a feel for what true conversational writing is.
They cover metaphor and simile, and, most especially, reducing wordiness or tightening prose.

She also goes over what she called ‘breaking rules prudently,’ which is what her grade school teacher taught her. Breaking rules should only be done intentionally for a certain effect, such as run-on sentences. What effect do you want on your reader? Finally, she has her students do a complete revision, and tells them she should only feel a slight deja vu when reading their revision. The changes should be foundational such as change in POV or moving from present to future tense. She does not want to know what happens next. Her challenge to students is letting them know that every word a student uses is a choice, and asking them “Are you being brave with this essay and how?”

Yours truly had a cushy presentation time, not too early and not too late. I was slotted at 11:15am on the first day, which gave me just enough time to see how other presenters presented, get the hang of the logistics, and then dive right into it. Along with the advantageous scheduling, I enjoyed the pleasure of presenting with two savvy professor writers who covered some innovative writing and teaching practices.

Laura Wetherington from Sierra Nevada College presented “Flipping the Creative Writing Classroom: Reading and Writing as Workshop.” In the flipped classroom, students gain exposure to new material. The flipped classroom is the anti-lecture, discussion based or workshop based, turning the workshop on its head. This kind of teaching has been dubbed the “new frontier” of the classroom. Students can reflect on authorial decisions to articulate why they made the choices they did and take creative approaches to reading. The emphasis is on reflective writing for each draft, and she has students revise with specific perameters, giving them a set amount of time to revise. Wetherington really stressed that students be conscious of the decisions they make on what to change with revisions, and she does this by giving them specific revision strategies that they have to choose from. She also quizzes them on technical terms and gives minute papers to guide their questioning with reading. Finally, she talked about the free-reading period where students came up with their own reading lists at the Poetry Center in the Sierra Nevada College. They roamed the library on their own to chose what they wanted to read to inspire their work.

Elizabeth-Jane Burnett from Newman University in Birmingham, UK covered “Trick or Retreat? The Value of Creative Writing Retreats in HE,” explaining how she takes her students to retreats where they learn how to write by deadlines. It’s a challenge to write on spot, on location, and they use the model of flipped classrooms. The marking or assessment is based on informed analytical engagement–a term I may have to borrow for my Craft is Culture class–and the students work on writing prompts first as a group then move onto their own individual work.

Our panel raised some heated debate, which was most welcome since I expect to answer the same questions and address the same reservations from my students and other faculty. For more info on my paper presentation “Craft is Culture: Writing and Reading a Global Imagination” click here and here. A South African writer kicked off the Q&A by asking me why we should force students to write diversely. She understood why reading diversely is important but writing with diversity in mind didn’t see urgent or necessary. Three other presenters answered her immediately, talking about intention, motivation, and the need to expand voice and perspective. Some recommended reading they pointed to me, which I have to look into is Paul Gilroy’s After Empire and Kimberly Crenshaw’s work on Intersectionality.

More on the conference and what I’ll be nicking for my own teaching and writing practices to come soon…

Part II: Recap on “Great Writing 2016: The International Creative Writing Conference UK

image
The view from the Kensington Flat, where I stayed during the conference.

Continuing coverage of “Great Writing 2016: The International Creative Writing Conference UK,” held at Imperial College, London, there were so many enlightening panels that offered great insight on the process of writing and best practices in teaching. Below is a taste from the hastily scribbled notes I took. Check out Part I here.

Melissa Bender’s “Just Like Us?: The Novelist’s Responsibility to the Historical Record, which she said was more of a meditation, focusing on Gwendolyn Brooks, Year of Wonders, a historical account of Derbyshire, 1666, where the town of Ames was quarantined to prevent the plague. Bender highlighted the idea of fidelity and reflected on how writers make decisions to be or not to be faithful to history, knowing that there are different histories. She focused on our responsibility as writers and readers to history, and how the historical novel transports readers to a different place, which allows readers to empathize with points of view that aren’t their own. The historians’ challenge versus the historical novelists’ challenge covers such questions as (some of the below are from yours truly):

  • What or who is demonised and why?
  • What is fetishized and why?
  • What is exalted and why?
  • Are the specific subjects demonized/fetishized/exalted to reflect our contemporary values or the values of the past?
  • What is the source of all the problems?
  • How do you develop empathy though you have a different set of values?

Bender cited Sarah Vowell, who says “education is empathy” and that we learn about our situations by taking in other’s people’s POV. Its not about policing the details of historical fiction or the duty to historical record. Novelists must use their imagination since we can’t recreate the past. As readers and writers we need to think about the choices we make and the consequences we create through narratives.

Lauren Hayhurst’s research perfectly coincided with mine in her talk “Creative Writers as Cultural Representatives: A critique of the ‘political’ in relation to ‘literature’ and how Creative Writing can help reinvent Multiculturalism.” Hayhurst doesn’t doubt the power of Creative Writing in multiculturalism. She spoke of the difference between process and product, and how the process is hidden. Reviewing the idea of British Multiculturalism, which she explained was met or is viewed as “confusion and ambiguity,” she highlighted how there is no consensus in its definition. Hayhurst pointed to Paul Gilroy’s After the Empire, and how Gilroy claimed that reckoning with history requires active dialogue to create cohesion. Fiction as an engagement with creativity. Writers must take ownership of our responsibility as cultural representatives, especially since we rely and use our products, the novel or text, to engage and understand the world. What biases inform our interpretations? Hayhurst demands a recognition of novels as a source and form of knowledge. She also referenced Jennifer Web and Donna Lee Brian’s idea on “agnostic thinking,” how knowledge is contingent as opposed to “true,” which provides a framework for an active dialogue. Hayhurst urges us to examine our motivations and intentions as writers.

One of the questions her presentation raised for me is how do we maintain the creative journey and intellectual discovery for the writer but also take into account our responsibility as “cultural representatives” or as givers of “knowledge”? How do we balance our discoveries as artists with the discoveries of the reader or what we want them to discover in our work?

Hayhurst wrapped up her presentation focusing on how writing requires developmental, growing consciousness?  Aesthetic values and ethical values are tied up she argues, concluding that our positionality leads to interpretation and therefore representation to the readers. “Its about flexing the imagination, imagining for your own gain or for someone else’s,” she concluded.

I truly hope to reconnect with Hayhurst, so we can collaborate on future work!
image

Toward the end of the conference, I had a chance to reconnect with a fellow Hawthornden resident, poet and professor Julian Stannard (photo above), who said that a poem is an accident. He read from his new work What Were You Thinking.

There were two papers that intriguingly covered process, valuing the craft of writing more so than the product. Annabel Banks’ “The Poesis Project: Real Time Capture of Poetic Process” and Rosie Shepherd’s of Goldsmiths College, UK, “Where is the Creative Process? Its right there!” seemed to be speaking directly to one another in terms of the physical process of writing and the process that takes form and eventually turns to content with a poem. Banks talked about how as we edit a text it grows and shrinks. The finished product could in a sense, as Banks explains, be the dead body, the corpse after its life has run its course. “We are networked, part of a knowledge matrix when we go online and work on a computer as opposed to working with the simpler technology of pen and paper” she says. Both Banks and Shepherd seemed to consider the product as secondary to the process and had me thinking how technology assists and enables content, meaning, and therefore interpretation.

Some general thoughts, that came up for yours truly is how do we imagine our imaginations? How is form formed? Craft is part artists’ intuition and other part artist’s extreme rationality. We make countless decisions as artists, and those decisions have to be calculated or based on some knowledge and prior experience or perhaps the artist’s intuition is simply based on gathered knowledge and experience. The product is a time stamp, a time capsule, and part of the continuum of work of the networked matrix. There is lots to ponder as the rains started to flood the streets of London. See the sky view from the Kensington flat below.

One more final installment to come. Stay tuned…

 

image